Description

I built this for my son as a present for getting into university, he's an engineering student so its good for working as well as gaming. I delidded the cpu and lowered the temps from high 70's to mid 60's. There are two prolimatech fans under the graphics card and one cable tied above the Noctua cooler. The little Noctua fans are exhaust fans cable tied onto the grill alongside the psu. I used the EVGA gpu because I thought it's open design would maximise the airflow. I don't like blower style cards as they are too hot and noisy. The m. 2 ssd is so easy to install whereas the ssd bracket is a pain. I got cable mod cables for the flexibility and they work superbly with the psu.I slightly modded the gpu support bracket and fixed it sideways to a fan mount and it holds the gpu firmly in place now. I really enjoyed working in this case and it went pretty well. My son has been using it for about 6 months now and is in love with it. Ignore the prices as it's taken me a while to get round to posting this (although the total is pretty close).

Part Reviews

CPU

It's powerful and fast I didn't want the extra heat from a 'k' and wasn't going to o/c in such a tiny case. I would probably have considered Ryzen but at the time of the build there weren't any good itx motherboards available.

CPU Cooler

It's hard to tell with the delidded cpu but l think it would struggle to cool it sufficiently without the delid.

Motherboard

Beautiful, very nice to work with, one more fan header than its rivals. I like the high spec power chokes, mosfets and capacitors and the high number of phases. Its also got thunderbolt 3 (although it is the lower throughput version) which is pretty impressive at this price.

Memory

It's half of a 64 GB set that I got on Ebay, it's a bit over the top but it might come in useful sometime. I used the XMP in the bios and it went straight to the published RAM speed (3333MHz). I decided against any further o/c as they're fast enough and I don't want any more heat.

Storage

So far so good, it was the best value 1tb ssd I could find. There's a lot of reviews about this case and the difficulty of installing 2 ssd's in the bracket so I decided to use a large capacity m. 2 and 1 large capacity ssd in the bracket instead. It's a good way to go because it simplifies the cabling in a very tight space and gives you a way to route your front panel connectors as a bonus.

Storage

Best price m. 2 I could find, fast, took about 10 seconds to install. I can't see much advantage in an nvme as this takes about 15 seconds to boot.

Video Card

Bloody expensive. I like the looks and cooling, I think it's open design works well in this case.

Case

I like the clean lines and simplicity of this case. You have to think about components and plan the build carefully but I really enjoyed working in this case. The only bad thing is the plastic tabs that hold the two halves together, they are difficult to separate and I'm scared that I'm going to break them every time I open the case up.

Power Supply

Works well, pretty quiet in this set up. The Modular system is ideal for this case. The cable mod cables are much more flexible than the standard cables. I changed the routing of the case's power cable so that it had a better orientation, it was only just long enough.

Case Fan

Seem pretty good, quiet.

Case Fan

Tiny, but help airflow in this case.

Comments

  • 11 months ago
  • 4 points

I'm a big fan of small builds. Nice work getting that all in there!

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, to tell the truth I enjoyed the challenge.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Neat little beast! Nice build.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, glad you like it, I'm going to do a simple Ryzen 3 apu build next.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Really tight little build. Nice job. I'm amazed by the power they pack in those SF power supplies. I've always used Silverstones, but I've never heard a bad word about the Corsairs either. Do you have any pics of it all put together? I'd like to see that case with a build in it.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, it went really well. I have never used a sfx psu before but it's pretty impressive. The last thing I did was plug in the graphics card so pictures 9 and 11 are complete apart from a bit of cable management, the loose cables are the fan splitters I use to connect up the 3 cable tied fans on the top half of the case (pic 8) I forgot to take a photo of it closed up and working but I'll get my son to send me one in January when he is back at university and I'll post it.

  • 11 months ago
  • 0 points

I bet those tiny 40mm fans probably sound like a tiny jet engine at full speed

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

The were ok when I was testing, he doesnt really care as he is a headphone gamer.

[comment deleted by staff]
  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks, it was fun and I had very few problems.

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

What problems occurred? I am going to build my first gaming PC tomorrow and I'm really scared. Just hope it turns on and not a waste of money. The funny thing is that i don't even know where half of the cables plug in:)

  • 11 months ago
  • 2 points

Just take your time, use you tube to see how things are done and check everything as you go. If you're building in this case there is very little space so you need to plan ahead, I had to change the psu power cable routing so it goes along the riser card side, modify the gpu support bracket so I could use it with fans installed, I also used the side of the sdd cage that was unoccupied to route the front panel cables out of the way. You will find some problems in a sff build but you can think around them and also look at completed builds here to find solutions. I hope that you have fun, good luck.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

Cheers for the reply I really appreciate that. I have been looking at youtube videos and understand certain bits but just an hour ago i opened up my old pc that needs to be thrown away, i was looking inside of it and seeing where all the cables were going on the motherboard so I have a basic idea now.

  • 11 months ago
  • 1 point

That's going to help, practice using the old motherboard and have a good look at the connections so that you will recognise them. The basic components are still going to be the same but modern connections are far superior and cases and fasteners are also much better designed.