Description

Update: 7/2/16 One of my little sub hobbies is collecting older graphics cards, with the goal of having one from each generation all the way from the GTX 200 series to present. As pricing allows I have been slowly expanding this collection. I recently collected the beautiful EVGA GTX 570 Classified, and decided it would be a nice bump coming from my rapidly aging GTX 260. I also have been rmoving hard drives from my other build and going fully solid state in that build so there are some minor changes comping to that one as well.

Details (temps, and such) are coming, but don't have all the numbers yet.

I have not yet settled on a specific use for this rig. However; I am aware of several poeple out there that have mentioned that the 2760 is actually a decent chip for gaming...the poor man's response to a 5960x if you will. As it is a Xeon it does not overclock, but it will turbo up to 3.30GHz which is still adequate for most games on the market. If I didn't go that route then I would choose to tinker with VMware and Hyper-V as I work in IT at a school and recently agreed to help with a technology club after school starting next year. Ideally I would collect some ECC RAM and up the capacity as well as expand my storage array if I start dabbling in VMs.

PARTS

This build was sparked by finding a E5-2670 for dirt cheap refurbished, and certified working. The rest is old parts I had sitting around with some additions the were added out of necessity.

The CPU cooler is a Ultra Chilltech Black hybrid, thermoelectric unit that has proved to be a very reliable solution since I purchased it back in 2012 on a black friday deal for about $30. A simple trip to Home Depot solved the issue of compatibility with LGA 2011 sockets.

The ssd, hdd, blu-ray drive, and video card were all sitting in an old C2Q build.

This is the second build I have used the RM750i psu in, and the first I've been able to actually use the corsair link utility in.

The motherboard was on the short list of options still available for this socket type that were ATX form factor. RAM was a curiosity piece as I always wanted to try mushkin, but hadn't found a build to use it in.

The Define R5 was the last minute pickup and it did not disappoint as it was a joy to build in, and packed the proper feature set at the right price.

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Comments

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

I've heard about this CPU! Available on ebay for like 70 bucks for a 16 thread beast! Pretty fantastic! I would love to have one of those to use for rendering in Blender. As it is, I'll probably just save up and wait for Zen. :)

  • 45 months ago
  • 2 points

It's a great CPU for around $75-120! I would wait for Zen though for the better feature set, and newer architecture.

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

+1 for the CPU and +10 for using Supermicro hardware! I've built two dual-socket machines with these processors, and they scream. With 16+ threads you can endlessly multi-task and the CPU won't break a sweat. Highly recommend filling up the motherboard with ECC ram, look on ebay for some server pulls, it's a cheap way to max out the capacity of your board.

  • 44 months ago
  • 2 points

Thanks! I was actually condsidering going dual socket when I ran across and ASUS board compatible with this chip, but was a little bummed out when I found that this one has a BIOS update that will make it NVMe compatible and that one wouldn't so I stuck with a single socket as a result. I will definitely look into the ebay for some ECC RAM down the road.

There really isn't enough supermicro based builds out there, and I thought it all came out pretty clean I'm a little sad I went with the windowless version of the R5 now haha