Description

DISCLAIMER: First time builder here & I've been gaming on a Surface Pro 3 for over 2 years (sad!) so I don't have great reference points of how things should be/perform and I'm easy to impress. I'm posting this as this community has been super helpful in helping me pick my components for this build so I want to give back. I also think lots of users are looking to build gaming PCs in this somewhat affordable range so hopefully this helps.

Overall, I'm really happy with the experience as a first time builder. With a bit of research and manual reading, I didn't run into any major challenges and my computer hasn't exploded so far. I must say things were way more user friendly than I expected (Bios are in colour now!?).

For parts, the build revolves around 2 recently released components: the Ryzen 5 1500X and the MSI Radeon 580X 4G. I liked the good reviews and the feeling of going with the latest products. Other components are pretty much fillers and I don't think they require many comments. I went for a SSD as I'd rather get a drive that's small but fast and even with games I find that 250Go is a lot when you don't do pictures/videos. Also might get more RAM later or replace with faster one.

Performance: The build performs well as far as I can tell, I've tried Far Cry Primal and Dota 2 so far, both run smoothly on high settings and it looks really beautiful on that 21.5" monitor. The noise was totally manageable for Far Cry Primal and not really noticeable for Dota.

Challenges: - The monitor didn't come with a DVI cable and the Radeon 580X doesn't come with a VGA output so that delayed my build (and it added some $$ as I wasn't willing to order hat DVI cable online and wait more). - The mother board only had 2 3-pin fan power supplies and I needed 3 (1 for the AMD CPU cooler + 2 for the cases' fans) so I had to get a cable to plug that extra fan directly into the power supply. - Plugging the cases front panel cables into the MB was a bit of a hustle. For some reason the wiring map details were not in the printed manual that was provided but I did find it on the MB's product page on Gigabyte's website very easily.

Price: It came to about CAD1350 before Windows (running the trial version for now) and including those extra parts I had to get. Got everything from Canada Computers website and their branch in Toronto and I'm happy with my experience there. Probably could have made it cheaper by going for the cheapest retailer for each part but not by much I think, especially since they had some rebates.

10/10, would build a computer again.

Comments

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build! It is always a special moment when you boot up your build for the first time and it works -- I doubt there will be any explosions if so just use liquid nitrogen.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Haha definitely :)

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

I think upgrading from bronze to gold power supply is worth your money, I'd check out EVGA SuperNOVAs theyre some of the most affordable and reliable out there, and don't break the bank. +1 for simple build

  • 31 months ago
  • 3 points

What would that do? My knowledge of SPU goes as far as "as long as you have enough power, you're set".

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

In short, you very often find bronze will be less efficient, noisier, and/or hotter. At length....This is taken from PC World: "Look for units with “80 Plus” certification. Though the certification process isn't especially stringent, 80 Plus-certified units are confirmed to be at least 80 percent efficient; and 80 Plus has tiers for even more-efficient units, including 80 Plus Bronze, Silver, Gold, Platinum, and Titanium certifications. Power supplies in the higher certification tiers tend to command very high prices, however. Average users with average needs should probably stick to the simple 80 Plus or the 80 Plus Bronze level unless they find a particularly juicy deal on a Silver or Gold PSU." Personally, for PSUs its all about efficiency and reliability. Platinum is unnecessary, but gold is affordable, quiet, and efficient; and a brand like EVGA with a line like SuperNOVA is damned dependable.

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

Interesting, thank you!

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

happy to help

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

I am not so experienced, but if you upgrade your ram, first go for more, then for faster. (in your case)

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

Noted, thanks for your feedback!

  • 31 months ago
  • 2 points

He's right, but only in this case haha. For gaming 16Gb is a must, you should look into getting a second stick. Also, you want to compare your motherboard's optimal/maximum RAM speed and get RAM with that capability. I bought DDR4 3200, just cause I can, but I probably didn't need that much. I sure as hell don't need 32Gb haha.

  • 30 months ago
  • 2 points

i thought 8 gb's of ram was the must ._.

Then again I only play csgo and rocket league so I shouldn't need 16

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

right well 8 is like functionally minimum....but If you play big games and want to run, well, anything else at the same time (CAM or other system status software, internet, etc.) I'd recommend more than 8Gb DDR4.

  • 31 months ago
  • 1 point

How much fps are you getting in dota 2?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

Would you be able to suggest other motherboards that would go good for this build?

  • 30 months ago
  • 1 point

I have a similar build and I used the MSI B350 Tomahawk. Works great for me. Here's a link to my build if you want to see the components: https://pcpartpicker.com/b/8rr6Mp

  • 14 months ago
  • 1 point

You have the wrong motherboard listed in your parts list. You have the GA-AB350M-HD3, not the GA-AB350M-D3H. They're not quite the same. I have no idea why Gigabyte would have two parts with such confusing numbers.

It is a nice build either way.

  • 31 months ago
  • -2 points

you should ve went with ryzen 1600 the 1500x is just 1400 with higher clock

[comment deleted by staff]