Description

This was a Desktop build to be used primarily as a CAD workstation working with SolidEdge and SolidWorks for a friend. Opted to throw an i9 in as they were originally quoted way over for an i7 so was able to cut costs whilst also improving spec.

Most of this build was fairly straight forward, we struggled getting a few of the drive cages out of the case but besides that was a smooth process. I wasn't that impressed by the airflow in the case using the stock fans, especially the intake from the front fan sat behind a dust filter and a door. For this reason I opted to intake from the top with the CPU cooler, however I'm not fully happy with any of the airflow and we've agreed to revisit it and add some better case fans in.

The benchmarks were very impressive and delivered exactly what we had expected. I opted to only install 32gb of ram as this left some head room for future upgrades as software becomes more demanding, plus the i9 has the potential to be overclocked if ever needed.

Despite the weak airflow the i9 sat at 30-31 degrees at idle which I was happy with. Under synthetic load it would hit 85, but I think with a better airflow system or even liquid cooling this would be far lower.

The Quadro P4000 performed way above what I expected, even if it is in the low percentile on userbenchmark. We even managed to test a few games even though this is a work only PC and it managed to handle RS Siege at 1440p 60FPS without too much issue and runs reasonably quiet and cool for a blower design.

Overall very happy with the finished build, lots of room for improvements going forward, cut a lot off the third party quoted price whilst building something very powerful. I didn't have access to my friend's CAD software at the time so was unable to test this further but I'm confident it will do the job and last some time.

Comments

  • 7 months ago
  • 6 points

Maye you should switch the card to the upper PCIe16x Slot, because the lower one operates only at PCIe 8x, for a little bit more performance :)

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info! I forgot to mention in the info that the motherboard manual was next to useless for this board, it was a few images of how to plug things in but no PCIe spec. I'll get that swapped over

  • 7 months ago
  • 3 points

In the last picture, I believe your ram is running at 2133Mhz, You want to enable XMP in BIOS and your RAM should be at 3200 ;)

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the info! We did notice this in the BIOS but forgot to set it, should be getting back a hold of it for some tweaks so will be sure to set it then!

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

This build is the first one I've seen with a Quadro. I think you put productivity before RGB. That's a great decision. It looks like a rather bland build but the productivity is what this build seems meant for. Nice job!

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Yeah run of the mill Workstation, this was a prototype build for a friends' company to see if the upgrade warranted the price, so all about bang for buck, as much as I do want to go crazy with RGB on my personal build!

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

Very nice! This looks somewhat similar to a build I'm currently planning for a friend as well. I'm concerned for the GPU though as I'm not sure it has the horsepower I need. It's a shame as the jump to the next tier is literally twice the price of the P4000.

Awesome looking build and I hope your friend likes it!

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! Yeah he's pretty happy with it, for his use case this was slightly overkill but the budget was there. What's your friends use case? For this use case it was to be used on large CAD drawings, his previous machine an i7-7700K with an M2000 just wasn't cutting it if he had multiple drawings open, plus the 16gb of ram was falling well short. He's not used it professionally yet but it should hold up strong.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Always better to build too much than too little.

For my use case, two P4000's would be connected and used to combine 8 4k displays to form one large one. Actually wouldn't be opting for a Quadro but think I have to due to their Mosaic ability which blends the monitors together and prevents desync.

  • 6 months ago
  • 1 point

Nice? For a display or gaming or CAD?

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

How does the 9900k fare on air cooling?

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

As I mentioned above it gets pretty hot under synthetic load, but overall stays pretty cool on normal tasks / gaming. I think with some better case fans and fan curve it would be easily maintainable. Hope that answers your question!

  • 7 months ago
  • 2 points

85°C is pretty hot for a workstation, idk if it will throttle though. Maybe you could switch to water cooling and you might be able to OC.

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

Yeah if we ever opt to overclock would definitely swap to liquid cooling and yeah 85 is toasty but I think the better fans and airflow will improve this, plus this was under 100% load on all 16 cores so can be expected

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

What orientation is your CPU fan looks like its blowing air out the top. If so I'd switch it to blow the air out the back. Rather than sucking I the hot air from the GPU into.your CPU. This could improve temps some and give you more head room

  • 7 months ago
  • 1 point

CPU cooler is oriented intake from above exhaust towards the GPU, was the best results in this setup, but hoping to intake from the front and exhaust from the back once we have better case fans and airflow