Description

Built on an extreme budget when I wanted to build a workable gaming PC, and one that I could use to record/stream Let's Plays from. It functions fine and I haven't yet found a game I can't play at least medium or high graphic settings on 720p or higher getting 45fps - 120fps (depending on the game and monitor I'm using). Originally started with the 8GB version of the stated RAM, but later upgraded to the 16GB set I listed.

The case leaves much to be desired in terms of wire routing and no RGB outside of lit fans, but it's a solid, sturdy metal construction with a nifty tray on the top to place things. The only problems I've ever had with this build so far was the death of the power supply after a power surge, but getting it replaced with quick and easy, and the graphics card barely fits in the case (it extends so far into the 5.25" tray bay that it effectively subtracts the total number of possible SSDs/HDDs by 2)

Comments

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point
  1. Why did you components supporting overclocking:

    • Motherboard
    • RAM
    • aftermarket thermal paste
    • aftermarket CPU cooler

when you did not buy an unlocked CPU, that would give you most of the speed potential, when it comes to overclocking and gaming?

  1. Why the Pro version of Windows instead of the Home edition?
  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

While it is extremely difficult to even understand you, let's try to make some sense here. They probably bought used parts and ended up with a locked cpu with a mobo with overclocking capability. They probably bought the cooler for better cooling, less noise, and better looks. Not like you can overclock that well on the 212 evo anyways. The ram has nothing to with overclocking.... They got pro because they may want the added features or it was cheap. It's also possible they live in a country where finding parts is difficult.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Comment edited, as it was malformatted (formatting does not work as it used to be for a few months now...)

Thanks for your reply, but I was interested in the builder's thoughts. I can make assumptions, but what good is it? :)

Not like you can overclock that well on the 212 evo anyways.

I overclocked my i5-3570K to 4.7 GHz (the base is 3.4 GHz) with the Cooler Master Evo 212. So I don't share your opinion. It allows you a fair overclocking. Are there better coolers? Sure, no doubt about that. But it's good value for a nice overlock.

The ram has nothing to with overclocking

What do you mean? You can overclock RAM. Enabling X.M.P. counts as overclocking. Without the Z87 chipset they would be limited to 1600 MHz or so. Just look at the specifications of the motherboard. Gigabyte says above 1600 MHz, any RAM setting is considered overclocking.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I'm sorry, with the way your comment originally looked it seemed like you had a few screws loose lol. I thought you meant ram affected how well you can overclock your cpu, and I know the 212 evo isn't a bad cooler but with Intel's latest volcanoes you would want something else

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

you had a few screws loose lol.

I do. But let's just keep silent about it. Sssh! :D

I know the 212 evo isn't a bad cooler but with Intel's latest volcanoes you would want something else

So I was a bit thinking too when saw the build, hence I asked the poster about his/her decision making. :)

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

Well, to be honest, I've never overclocked before, so it wasn't a factor when building this rig. I was going purely on a strict budget. Got several parts second hand or during steep sales. A few were even gifted to me.

I went with a locked CPU, because A) As I stated before I'd never overclocked before, don't know how to do it, and didn't see it as a priority, and B) due to my budget, and the locked version being over $100 cheaper, at the time, I went for the locked version.

I went with an aftermarket CPU cooler and paste because my previous intel CPU's stock cooler had cheap plastic locks (or nubs, or... whatever they're called) and broke while the CPU was in use (after several hours) and the stock cooler broke clean off and my CPU overheated and died nearly instantly. It never turned on again until I replaced the CPU. I sought to prevent a future occurrence. (The loud metallic THUD noise of the stock cooler hitting the bottom of my case, followed by the shrill piercing alarm that happened that day is something I'll never forget and haunts me to this day)

I went with the Pro version of Windows over Home for, in all honesty, the vainest reason possible. The word Pro is in the name. I've always got the Pro version of Windows when applicable for that very reason. Stupid? Yes, I know.

This computer was built with my strict budget (and the charity of others) in mind. It was built just so I could start my YouTube and Twitch channel(s) and, if they ever amounted to anything, I'd be able to use this rig to build up a revenue for a nicer one.

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I used my stock Intel cooler for ages (5 years or even more?). Never had any problems with it. Maybe I got lucky. But I definitely wouldn't have wanted to be in your shoes when something inside your computer case "exploded".

If you will never attempt overclocking, you could get parts cheaper next time as typically Z series motherboards are for overclockers. No need to pay for features that you'll never use.

Pro version of the Windows OS over Home does not offer many benefits. was wondering if you would use them. Well, at least you can have an OS with a fancier name. :D

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I didn't say I would never overclock. I was just saying in this instance it was not a priority. I am, currently, doing research and trying to learn what I can so I can attempt in future build(s).

  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

lol. That was not English...

What I meant, is "Why did you buy components supporting overclocking: [list of components] while you did not buy an unlocked CPU [...]"

[comment deleted]
  • 23 months ago
  • 1 point

I thought I was writing in English ;_; But I'll try again...

The components I did buy were a mix of components I thought looked good or I could afford based on suggestions I got from friends and co-workers who's opinions I valued.

[comment deleted]
[comment deleted]