Description

This is a shrink-down of my previous Gaming Cube build. I originally bought the Corsair Air 240 as my option for a smaller portable PC. Although the Air 240 was an EXCELLENT case, it was not really the small form factor I was looking for. I need something I can easily pick up and bring to the girlfriend's house or move around the office at work.

Enter - the Raijintek Metis Plus case. It is nice and small, and the Dan Case A4 isn't readily available yet. I leave the overclocking and gnarly components to my main rig, so even though this doesn't have the best airflow it should be fine for my purposes. I ended up removing the window and putting some mesh on the side, and also experimented with adding a 140mm fan to the mesh. I added a super slim 120mm fan above the GPU that is pretty quiet, and dropped a good 3-5 degrees average. At the moment both rear and top fans are set to intake, and hopefully the pressure is pushing the exhaust out through the mesh sidepanel. Still figuring out best cooling set up!

I know - my cable management looks like an absolute rats nest, but I just got this thing together and running. Will slowly improve the interior over time, it bugs me too!

I will mainly be playing Overwatch/Destiny 2/PUBG for the time being. Seems to run those great without getting too hot!

Part Reviews

CPU

Impressive CPU. Originally obtained in my Dell XPS 8700 and moved to a couple different builds. Boosts up to 3.9 GHz and doesn't run too hot. No reason to replace this in my small build unless I get better cooling and want to overclock.

CPU Cooler

Surprisingly good given the size and price of this cooler. I put this on in place of a Cryorig C7 because of how the airflow in my case is laid out, and saw an improvement of roughly 2-3 degrees celsius under load and at idle. Comes with mounting hardware for an additional fan as well if you have one laying around.

I wish it had my copper parts, but overall is a great cooler.

Case

I bought this case while waiting for the Dan Case A4 to become readily available to the public, and for the price it is pretty sweet!

Construction feels good, it is very small overall and can fit in a large backpack, and it looks great aesthetically. I replaced the cheesy side panel window with some metal mesh and it helped a lot.

A bit hard to build in and airflow is not excellent, which keeps me from giving it 5 stars - but it is a fun project to make everything work in the case. That's part of the fun I suppose!

Comments

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice build! I like your case. It's very unique. Well done!

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

Oh that's a cool- OH GOD

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

:3

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Very nice build! Just out of curiosity, but where would you be moving your PC too? Why portability?

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks! I keep this PC at my office and sometimes move it around to other desks depending on who I get to play with. I also have a Yamaha scooter and am a cyclist, so I wanted a PC that I could transport around on my bike/scooter in a backpack. Most places I am bringing it to will already have a monitor set up, so I just need to bring my box and a mouse/keyboard. Between work/home/GF's house mainly.

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

that cable management tho

  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Always love seeing fellow Metis Plus users. Great idea for airflow as well.

Did you keep the fan on the side mesh or did you ditch the idea? Because you can probably use it as a great exhaust or even intake if you want to reverse another fan.

  • 19 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah it's a pretty cool case. Nice build yourself!

I tried using that side panel fan as an intake and also tried exhaust, but I think the air was just moving between the rear fan and the side one rather than hitting the CPU heatsink, they were just too close together. It was also noisey as an intake for some reason!

I ended up putting a slightly bigger CPU cooler on there (Cryorig H9i) and flipping my PSU around. Now the rear fan is an intake, pushes air into the CPU cooler, which then exhausts through the power supply and also that side panel mesh (with no fan). It seemed to cool things down quite a bit, with CPU temps being 33C-65C and GPU temps in a similar range.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

I like it. Anyone willing to build in this case gets my vote. This thing can definitely test you patience. I recently upgraded my cpu in mine and had to practically disassemble the entire thing to do it. How are you liking that H9, I went with an H7 for my build but am considering the H9 for another build.

  • 18 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks man. It was a test of patience for sure, but rewarding and I enjoyed the challenge!

The H9 and other cooling changes I made were a big step in the right direction, and the thing is still pretty small. I figured it would be good to take advantage of the cooler since it would fit in the case no problem. Idle temps and load temps went down by quite a bit, I also flipped my PSU around so it could vent some hot air. I would recommend the cooler for this case.

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  • 19 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the +1!

I am actually going to add some more pics today. I changed the CPU cooler to the Cryorig H9i to improve airflow and because I had room, and it made a big difference of about 5C-8C average in temps. I think that C7 would be better used in a smaller/flatter case. I also flipped my PSU around so it can be used to help exhaust.

I actually used to have a 1050 Ti and recently upgraded to this card. The 1050 Ti was sufficient for well optimized games like Overwatch, but suffered a little bit in Witcher 3 and PUBG which I also play. The 1060 6GB can run High/Ultra settings in those games at 1080p and feels super smooth. In my mind it was worth the extra $80 or so bucks!

Hope that helps, more pics coming later today of the interior.

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