Description

Hello fellow PC Building Enthusiasts!

This is yet another build that I did for a streaming friend, there are even more prospective builds on the way! The client wanted to be able to run streaming software, PC games and other applications at the same time. He wanted to be able to play most games at High-Ultra settings at or around 60FPS in 1080p and also specifically requested that the CPU to be an i7. His budget was ~$900 so it wasn't entirely difficult to make that happen but the 4790k did take up a little over 1/3 of his budget.

CPU - Great chip, alright price, it works great for the multitasking he'll be doing.

CPU Cooler - A cool little cooler from Rosewill that was cheap and matched the color scheme of the build. It doesn't fare much better than the stock intel cooler but it runs much quieter and looks way "cooler" lol

Motherboard - This is one place where we saved some serious money, I had the Maximus VII Hero lying around from a previous build and decided it was time to give it a new home. It was literally collecting dust inside of an empty 450D Corsair case and I had to hit it with the some compressed air before putting the CPU and RAM inside. It's normally a $200 motherboard so hopefully he likes it, charity is fun! XD

Memory - 2x4GB sticks of DDR3 - 1600 RAM from G.Skill, nothing special and it was a good price. Only issue I had was that the system wouldn't post with both sticks installed initially; I had to remove a stick, setup the memory profile in the BIOS, change the BIOS to "Fast Boot - Disabled" and THEN install the second stick after a reboot. Everything seems to working fine now, both modules are running in dual channel mode.

Storage - Went with a small and cheap 60GB SSD for the OS and ESSENTIAL applications, a 1TB 7200RPM Seagate holds everything else.

GPU - This is my second time working with the GTX 960 and I'm here to say that it's quite the beefy little graphics card for just $200. I was able to get a respectable overclock on it and the Windforce edition stays very quiet compared to my wife's White MSI GTX 960 OC. I'm a huge fan of this card for mid-range gaming PC's.

Case - Having worked/struggled with the Spec-02 I was reluctant about trying the Spec-01 but since the CPU cooler wasn't huge and the front fans were easier to mount I actually enjoyed this build much more. It was still a pain to manage the cables in the back of the case but the whole evolution took less time overall than the Spec-02. Would definitely recommend this case for people looking for that "Gaming PC" look on a budget.

PSU - Just a cheap semi-modular 450W PSU from Rosewill, I would normally go with Corsair for the PSU but this one was on sale.

OS - Windows 8.1, because Windows.

Feel free to comment with your questions/concerns/comments, thanks for checking out the build!

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Comments

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

How loud is the fan on the cpu cooler?...looks pretty cool

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

The CPU cooler is arguably the quietest fan in the build even though it's the smallest! It's overclocking capabilities aren't really up to snuff but it looks great and was cheap so I'm happy with it! =)

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

I really should give the +1 for the charity mobo. Even I am not that generous. Well done and hope he enjoys it.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks for the kind words! With regards to the motherboard, I know how rough it is getting started as a streamer (my wife currently streams full time) and I felt like this was my contribution to his endeavors. I didn't even have plans to use the MOBO in a future build of mine because of it's size, so it just seemed like it was time to let it go. I'm happy that I was able to help him out and he's super excited about the build so everything worked out! =)

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Hi, I was wondering about the PSU you choose. It says you choose Rosewill because it was cheap and on sale but you mentioned a Corsair one. What Corsair one do you normally use?, hope it is somewhat cheap.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Hello! The Corsair that I usually use for low budget/low wattage builds is the CX430 or CX430M. Here's a link https://pcpartpicker.com/part/corsair-power-supply-cx430m It's great for a small low budget starter build that isn't too power hungry, usually retails for about $50. I would go for the semi-modular version that I linked because cable management is much easier!

Cheers!

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Thanks

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Where do you connect all your fans? There's only one case fan pin slot in my mobo. Same case..

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

The motherboard that I used for this build had plenty of extra fan headers so that wasn't really an issue for me. If you don't have enough fan headers you can always use Molex cables from your PSU to power the fans but if you do that they can't be controlled by software and will run at full speed all the time.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

My front case fan has a 4 pin, so I don't really know what cable I would plug that into.. I guess I got to take a look at it.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

So I bought a 3 pin male and molex ended cable..I used my Psu type 3 end to the psu and the molex female end to the male end molex from the other cable, then plugged the pins to the fan cable.. This didn't work.. For some reason the molex end of the cable I bought had 2 pins, with the other two empty.

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

This is what I use for builds with a mobo that doesn't have enough fan headers. It uses one molex connector and splits it 3 ways. There are cheaper variations out there but I like the Bitfenix build quality, the fact that the cables are black and they're sleeved.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16812493031

  • 58 months ago
  • 2 points

How About Motherboard? Nice Buils ;)

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

What games do you play? and +1

  • 58 months ago
  • 1 point

Hey man, I have the same case with a 1 fan header mobo. How do I connect extra fans? I use a 3 female pin/Molex cable to connect the front fan to the PSU via the molex/Type 3 connector, but that didn't work for some reason..

  • 50 months ago
  • 1 point

considering getting this build when i can afford it, but I have never built a pc before :/

  • 59 months ago
  • 0 points

Ok... I'll buy that the Rosewill cooler might be quieter than stock (it looks to be about a 90 or 92mm fan) but only a 60GB SSD? Why so small? And all that extra SATA cabling needs hiding. I'm not going to hold the case against you; I was going to use it for the very same reason, it's cheap and looks okay. (I really am not a fan of "gamer"- look cases though and I happened to be still collecting parts when a (IMHO) better case went on sale, so I really lucked out. Better fans , better looks and more room for cable management were bonuses.) I might have gone with a slightly bigger power supply just to have some extra oomph for overclocking; you gave him a 4790k, after all. Then there's the card... I don't know who told the client that he needed to have an i7, but I do know that they did say anything about getting a card to match the CPU's capabilities. I'm not hating on the GTX960; I'm running one in my new build and I love it. But... that 4790 should really have a 970 or something to go with it.

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

Didnt you read the description?

  • 59 months ago
  • 0 points

Yep, I did. I think that giving the client the motherboard was a mistake, as well as the client's insistence on having a i7 on only a $900 budget. People need to look at not only the planned uses of the computer, but also if they plan to upgrade it at some point to get to where they really want to go. I get the feeling from this config that the client was told that an i7 was a must have to the exclusion of all else in the system, and that's why it doesn't seem (to me, anyway) balanced in terms of it's initial capabilities. You don't need that much i7 to run a GTX 960; dialing that back some would allow for a bigger SSD or better video card, for example.

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Dude it wasn't his choice so stop actin like a moron. We all know the i7 does help in gaming compared to the i5. The costumer should get what they want no matter what. The guy can't say no to the costumers wants otherwise he wouldn't have the costumer.

  • 59 months ago
  • 0 points

I never said he should go to an i5... Look, instead of calling me names, just read the OP's rebuttal below.

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

I did. I never said you said he should go with an i5. You just had a smart *** comment that didn't make you look smart

  • 59 months ago
  • 1 point

First off I wanted to say thanks for the feedback! I'll try to address all of your concerns since the description above didn't quite cut it for you. Note, that most of the part decisions were based purely on budget and certain parts that are common in other "gaming builds" were simply not an option at the client's budget of $900. Also, I'd like to note that a good portion of user builds on this site don't seem to put in the OS as a factor when adding up cost; I however do take this into account and it does change the part selection process.

The SSD was something that the client wanted to add after we already sorted out most of the build. He decided that he wanted to tack on an additional $100 to the budget (which was originally only $800) so that he could get a small SSD for his OS and a better graphics card. Originally we had NO SSD in the build (because budget simply didn't allow for it) and only a GTX 750ti for the GPU. The extra $100 allowed us to spend $50 on an SSD and an extra $50 to get a GTX 960, it's as simple as that.

The PSU I selected mostly based on budget as well and in my experience 450 watts is more than enough to put a mild overclock on a 4790k; this is the Maxwell family we're talking about here, it's not a power hungry Vishera. Although if you could find a more powerful PSU from a reputable manufacturer for <$50 I would be glad to check it out!

Which leads to my next point, the GTX 960 was literally all that the client had room for in the budget after the 4790k and the rest of the components were factored in, even at the raised budget. I even alleviated matters further by contributing a free motherboard to the build because I knew that with the 4790k stifling the already strict budget that we would have to make serious cuts. This route enabled us to still get a very competent 1080p gaming card (the GTX 960 is definitely the sweet spot at 1080p) AND not have to make any additional changes to the build.

I'll add that just because the 4790k "pairs better" with a stronger card doesn't mean that the only option when considering this CPU is a stronger GPU. This computer was purpose built for the client, Streaming first and Gaming second, explaining why more than a third of the budget went towards the CPU and not the GPU. If we had an extra $150 in the budget then yes, I probably would have gone with a GTX 970 but as it stands the computer is running great without one.

  • 59 months ago
  • 0 points

Ok... then why not go for a i7-4770? It's still a perfectly respectable streamer but $50 less; that would mean a bigger SSD or even a better cooler. (At 100% utilization, my 8320 pulls 58w or so. Vishera isn't that bad, actually :) ) I never said the 960 was a bad card, it's actually a great card, especially if you need to run a small power supply (you're gonna pull somewhere around 325 - 350w with that config; I like to run with more room if possible, especially since I live in a hot climate) and still get great 1080p performance. Overall, if the client is happy with the streaming and gaming performance then it's a good build. My comments were about the difference in advice and compromises I'd use to get there.

[comment deleted]
  • 59 months ago
  • 3 points

Maybe it was in... Rubels or something? :P

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Pesos

  • 59 months ago
  • 2 points

Nice catch! It was late when I wrote this so I must not have caught that on my proofread =P