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A Powerline Adapter is a pure gamble.

minervyx

22 months ago

Depending on your home's electrical engineering, you could get Ethernet-like speeds, or you can get speeds that barely compete with 90's dial-up and are worse than a tiny USB dongle.

Powerline is better for stability, but not necessarily for speed. A PCIE wifi adapter is a safer purchase.

Comments

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

I used a powerline adapter for a while, and it was only getting 10Mbps average (1MB). I upgraded to a PCIE adapter and my speeds shot up.

  • 22 months ago
  • 2 points

Yeah im thinking to go back to PCIE, in getting around 70mbps on powerline, used to get much better on my pcie card

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

I use a WiFi PowerLine Adapter in a 25-year old home and Ethernet directly to the router I’m getting 36Mbp/s and the Powerline Adapter in a remote part of the house is getting around 32-34Mbp/s.

Also the WiFi signal strength near the router is about -72dBm which is perfect. Before the Powerline Adapter the signal strength was between -19-22dBm and after the PowerLine Adapter it went up to around -67dBm. So that should tell you the dependability considering your house is wired correctly of a Powerline Adapter.

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

I think this comment still explains the issues with powerline network adapters pretty well: https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/67895-power-line-adapters#cx670043

  • 22 months ago
  • 1 point

It does depend on the wiring. I'm getting pretty good speed on the whole with 4 x AV1200 adapters, a mix of TP Link and Solwise models (the house has quite a few WiFi "dead zones" so these seemed the easiest option), but as you can see the speed between the different adapters varies widely depending on where in the overall circuit each adapter is placed. Plus despite the claimed 1000-ish Mbps connection speed across some legs, the most I have ever in reality seen on a file transfer is about 40 Megabytes a second. Still, does the job, and that is fast enough for me. The only problem is occasionally they just drop the connection altogether, and fiddling with the software or resetting the adapter is needed to get it back.

https://imgur.com/a/yoDpU

  • 22 months ago
  • -1 points

No. I use a powerline adapter in a 10 year old home and it works fine, getting solid 20 mbps compared to 3 with wifi.

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