add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube

High temps and loud fan noise?

kaitlyn2004

5 months ago

I've got:

  • ryzen 2700x w/ stock wraith prism cooler
  • ASRock b450 gaming itx motherboard
  • zotac 1070 mini
  • fractal core 500 case

It seems whenever I do anything remotely intense (i.e. content-aware fill in Photoshop), the CPU temp and cooler rpm spike for a few seconds. It's annoying because it's like a constant on-off effect.

I was looking into things a bit more and with the case taken apart (open sides+top) my idle-ish temp was about 31c, and rendering a video in davinci resolve got it up to about 74c. I THINK these temps are fine?

However, with the case back on my CPU never really dropped below 38c, and rendering same video got me yo 80c. Has me a bit more worried?

Is there anything I can do about the aggressive spiking CPU cooler where the fan always shoots up and then down after such a short period of time?

Anything about cooling? Should I be looking at adding 1 (or 2?) Intake fans to the top of case? Do I need to be considering an alternative cooler? I've heard the wraith prism is actually supposed to be decent?

Bios has the CPU fan on standard mode. No overclocks

Comments

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

You most definitely need exhaust fans on the top of the case. NOT intake fans.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I have them installed as intake (2x140mm Noctua NF-A14). On the fractal website they also said they top is for intake?

I believe the wraith cooler is an intake fan, rather than a blowing up? So I imagine that having them as intake is indeed the best option?

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Heat rises so use that to your advantage. You need air to move into the case and then out as quickly as possible to remove as much heat as you can. You also have to keep in mind the internal pressure of the case so it doesn't fill with dust. You will want to maintain a neutral or positive pressure along with filters on the intake fans.

Here's what I would try. Rear fan as an intake, top fan closest to the rear fan as an intake and the top fan closest to the front of the case as an exhaust fan. This would keep air flowing over the CPU and keep a positive pressure as there are 2 pulling air in and 1 pushing it out.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

If you cool your CPU with air your case needs good air flow. The case only seems to have a single exhaust fan. This is not ideal IMO. If you can add a fan or 2 to the top I would make then intake. This would draw cooler air over the CPU and blow it out the back. If all your fans are exhaust fans the cooler air being drawn in would be restricted. Try it both ways and see what works best. Get noctua fans they are some of the best.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

I installed 2 140mm (Noctua NF-a14) fans as intake at the top. It seems its sucking in plenty of air where air is actively being pushed out some of the other grill holes - like where the GPU is. I assume this is totally fine though?

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

The only concern that I have with this setup is the top/rear fan is exhausting out the back before it gets used to cool anything. I suggested a solution to this a few minutes ago.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

You should play around with it and see what works best. Keep as it is now and record your temps at idle and under load, maybe over a few days. Switch the top fans to exhaust and do the same thing. Honestly I don't think you'll see much difference either way but you do want the setup to be the optimal one. Acewingman has a good suggestion.

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

Do I need to be considering an alternative cooler?

On max-load you can expect the wraith cooler to sound off as it's a 40+ dba unit. An after market cooler with a beefier heatsink + premium fan/s can cut those noise levels down to half. Something like this: https://pcpartpicker.com/product/TsL7YJ/thermalright-cpu-cooler-machodirect

Should I be looking at adding 1 (or 2?) Intake fans to the top of case?

I think you meant "exhaust". Heat travels upwards hence top fan mounts are better utilised as exhausts. For intake fans, you can have them mounted on the front of the case (internally).

Bios has the CPU fan on standard mode.

If not in a rush to upgrade to an aftermarket cooler or if you prefer the RGB ring effect on your current set up, assuming you don't plan on overclocking - maybe try a softer fan-curve approach which will minimise the instantaneous RPM ramp-up. I had a similar issue with my AIO and manually configured the fan profile with a more minimalist RPM climb approach. At max speeds the RPMs will kick in with the same noise levels but it helps to eliminate those hasty and short-lived RPM spikes. You should have presets already available (in BIOS) alongside your current "standard" mode - eg. "silent" (etc).

  • 5 months ago
  • 1 point

My understanding is the top fan locations of the core 500 should be used as intake, and the rear fan exhaust (which is how it comes installed)

I found that I was still getting these crazy fan spikes with both standard and even silent mode, but I'm working on playing with the custom fan profile to make it less aggressive...

Sort

add arrow-down arrow-left arrow-right arrow-up authorcheckmark clipboard combo comment delete discord dots drag-handle dropdown-arrow errorfacebook history inbox instagram issuelink lock markup-bbcode markup-html markup-pcpp markup-cyclingbuilder markup-plain-text markup-reddit menu pin radio-button save search settings share star-empty star-full star-half switch successtag twitch twitter user warningwattage weight youtube