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Which CPU home office

dethnode1

3 months ago

Ok, I apologize if this is the incorrect forum for this thread. I know that most diy builds are focused on gaming, and perhaps it would be better served for me to purchase a prebuilt for my use. If that is the case, then by all means please advise me to do so.

I am looking to build a new PC for my home office. I am a CPA and need a computer at home to work on when I can not get to the office. I use a laptop at the office, but it was provided by my firm. It is horrendously slow, and quite new.

The uses will be for heavy microsoft excel usage with large data sheets(switching to mysql is not really an option), various accounting programs like quickbooks, general web browsing, and the occasional streaming video on youtube. There will be no gaming played on this machine.

I have the storage, ram, monitor, case, power supply, and all of that sorted. The question, and this is the first question I should have answered, is what CPU do I need or want. Since I do not need gaming graphics, I at first thought APU like a Ryzen 5 3400G, but then I thought "do i want half my CPU going to graphics when I need that power for processing data for my work? Then I thought about a Ryzen 5 3600 but then I have to pay a separate GPU and that seems wasteful.

Currently I am considering a Ryzen 5 2600, the cost is lower than the 3600 so I could get a GPU to enable the entire CPU to be used for data processing. and keep the cost around the same as the 3400G.

Basically I am all over the place on costs vs performance for my desired tasks and could use someones advice as to what would be the way to go.

Comments

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

I would point you at the Ryzen 2600, put a decent ($20-$30) CPU cooler on it, maybe 32GB memory for your heavy spreadsheets, and a lightweight GPU like a GT 1030. (or possibly RX 550/560, but the 1030 is a better choice for most people IMO.) The 1030 isn't expensive (you can get them for under $100), and by decoupling the GPU and CPU, you can move up the Ryzen line if it turns out to be necessary as your workflows change. Or, change out the GPU if you end up doing GPU intensive work.

  • 3 months ago
  • 1 point

If you are not gaming try get an Intel CPU since they come with integrated GPU. The data you are processing is nothing that will make the CPU work hard - mostly single core processing. If you are using algorithms that require parallel computes then multicores can help - array processing, multivariate models and so on. If not, stick with a nice Intel CPU, something like the i3-9100 or even the i3-9400. Just be sure to get the non-F models since you want the integrated graphics to display on monitor. Depending on data sizes you may want more than 16GB Ram.

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