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Intel i5 9600k or AMD Ryzen 3600x?

ScTALE
  • 1 month ago

I would like a desktop computer mainly for gaming, but also for running some virtual machines and other stuff. Which of the following configuration should be the best? https://pcpartpicker.com/user/ScTALE/saved/#view=f9D3ZL https://pcpartpicker.com/user/ScTALE/saved/#view=mRrDcf

Comments

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

PCPartPicker Part List

Type Item Price
CPU AMD Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $169.99 @ Amazon
CPU Cooler Thermalright TRUE Spirit 140 Direct 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $42.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte X570 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX AM4 Motherboard $234.99 @ B&H
Memory OLOy 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $116.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP EX950 2 TB M.2-2280 NVME Solid State Drive $249.99 @ Newegg
Video Card MSI GeForce RTX 2070 SUPER 8 GB GAMING X TRIO Video Card -
Power Supply Phanteks AMP 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $99.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $914.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2020-02-14 14:40 EST-0500

-2700x for your VM workloads and "other stuff" would probably be more valuable than the slight single core advantage of the 3600. For purely gaming the 3600 is slightly better; depends on your priorities and workload. The 3600x is not worth the extra cost.

-Cheaper RAM at the same spec.

-Cheaper but still very effective CPU cooler.

-Much better quality motherboard. I'm assuming you wanted Wifi 6 support. If not, the Asus Tuf Wifi is cheaper and still higher quality than the Pro Carbon.

-Swapped the jank double NVMe setup for a good 2TB drive. Simpler and a lot more space.

-Better PSU.

I would not recommend the 9600k whatsoever. Dead platform, so the highest CPU you can get is the 9900k and upcoming chips will use a new socket. Some modern titles are showing issues on 6 core/6 thread CPUs at high settings, and this multithreading trend is going to continue. AM4 platform wins in upgrade potential and core count for the money.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Why do you think that the MSI's motherboards have less quality than Asus's?

Why do you think that a double NVMe setup isn't good? I will keep permanent data in another external device; 1 ssd is for the os and the other for games.

Which are the aspects that makes your PSU better than the one i chose?

Thank you

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

MSI's motherboards

It's not about specific branding here. MSI has some great motherboards available like the x570 Unify or B450 Tomahawk. The problem is they absolutely screwed up their lower end X570 boards. The VRMs and heatsinks are abysmal in comparison to pretty much every other X570 board out there. This may not matter as much with a 3600 for example, but if you wanted to pick up a used 3900x or other beefy upgrade down the line, the VRM can thermal throttle. And without a proper finned heatsink like the B450 Tomahawk, airflow isn't as effective in keeping temps under control. Finally, there are other boards available at a similar or lower price that do not have the VRM concerns at all. Gigabyte's Aorus Pro WiFi is an example at a similar price. Asus did a remarkable job with their budget X570 boards, especially the Tuf. This is why I recommend the Tuf over the Carbon if you dont need WiFi 6, or the Gigabyte Pro if you do.

double NVMe setup

Endurance scaling, cost, and leaving room for expansion. You can set up the disk into two partitions if desired.

At the very least just get a decent 1tb unit. HP's EX920, Silicon Power A80, something like that.

PSU

The Phanteks is a rebrand Seasonic Focus Plus Gold. It's a bit higher performing and a more modern platform than the G1+ for not much more money. You could also spend an extra $10 for the Corsair RMx which would be quieter.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

3600x no doubt

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

and unless you plan to OC anything, the cooler that comes with the 3600x should work just fine! (its much better than intels stock cooler)

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Does the 3600x comes with a stock cooler?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

yes, a very decent one (i wouldnt call it amazing, but it is definitely plenty of cooling)

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Can you explain why? Isn't an intel cpu a forward-looking choice?

  • 1 month ago
  • 2 points

Not right now, best you can do is the 9900k, and it's a single digit number (around 7-8%) better for fps.

And no hyper-threading!

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I'd flip the 3600X for a 2700X and put the extra into storage.

250gb+500gb isn't much and you'll run into issues fast.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Between 2700x and 3600x there are just 50€, maybe it will be better to buy a more recent cpu.

I will use the primary partition just for OS and the second one just for games. They should be enough, shouldn't they?

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

If you only run a few games maybe.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

I'll second this suggestion. Depending on what titles you play 500GB will fill up extremely fast.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Maybe yes, but I will only play 2-3 games at the same time; I will only start another one deleting one of the previous finished game.

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

Better way to go. Cost less and double the drive space.

https://pcpartpicker.com/list/YBpfn7

  • 1 month ago
  • 1 point

AMD Ryzen 3600x?

People always recommend the AMD chip with a mind for an "upgrade path" - considering Intel dead and AMD fully alive and conscious. This upgradeability is only a factor if in the next 12 months or so you will plan an upgrade based on improved economic circumstances. If you intend to build and stick for longer than two years with it, the odds of you wanting to upgrade on what will soon be a dead platform will diminish to around zero.

As an example, the Intel i7 7820X, when it came out in 2017, it was the fastest 8 core on the market and was a desirable chip to own. Ryzen 7 2700X beat it one year later for less than half the price, the Ryzen 7 3700X runs some applications twice as fast as the Intel i7-7820X another year later. How far down the hill do you think the i7-7820X has tumbled?

The same will happen with the Ryzen 9 3950X which will be one cpu upgrade you could do if you invested in AMD's X570 chipset. Come late 2022 / early 2023 you will not even be able to give these away. People always recommend "you can always upgrade to it in future" forget that in that hypothetical future nobody in their right mind would want to throw good money after old and bad.

Again using the i7 7820X analogy - you could not even give one of these CPU's away today. Even if you added in a free X299 motherboard.

Intel i5 9600k or AMD Ryzen 3600x?

With prior advise in mind, pick what you can afford now, use, enjoy, and replace when the time comes for a new PC. Leveraging between gaming and virtual machines, I say the Ryzen 7 2700X is still the best bang for buck CPU on the market. It literally does fall under "Jack of All Trades". The Intel i5-9600K is not a bad CPU for an overclocker and it will run games very nicely for at least a couple of years if not more.

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