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Help me choose SSD & HDD

bbjlfvr
  • 8 days ago

Hi everyone, My current rigs are as below:

Motherboard - https://pcpartpicker.com/product/G9X2FT/msi-z270-sli-plus-atx-lga1151-motherboard-z270-sli-plus Boot (OS) - PNY 240 SATA SSD https://pcpartpicker.com/product/7v38TW/pny-internal-hard-drive-ssd7cs1311240rb Storage - WD Blue 1 TB SATA HDD https://pcpartpicker.com/product/MwW9TW/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd10eze

I am thinking of adding a bigger SSD and HDD because I am running out of storage and games that I play require bigger space. I won't be transferring big chunks of data regularly so NVMe m.2 is not mandatory (but if there is a good option with a similar price point to SATA SSD would definitely consider)

Currently, my OS and other main applications are installed on PNY SATA SSD and fully boots up in 3-4 seconds which is great.

I have narrowed down a couple of lists and would like to hear your thoughts. If there are better options, do advise me. Need good SSD with nice durability (longevity, read/write speed) and of course within affordable price range.

SSD - Crucial MX500 1 TB SATA SSD https://pcpartpicker.com/product/h3tQzy/crucial-mx500-1tb-25-solid-state-drive-ct1000mx500ssd1 HDD - WD Blue 4 TB https://pcpartpicker.com/product/jp2rxr/western-digital-internal-hard-drive-wd40ezrz (will 5400 vs 7200 RPM matter) Is Blue a good option?

Thank you all. Much appreciated.

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Comments

  • 7 days ago
  • 2 points

I'd recommend paying the 3 extra bucks or so and buying from newegg, Amazon has a notorious history of grabbing from just any supplier's hard drives, many of which are used. The Seagate is also an option, depending on how you feel about Seagate reliability.

Any hard drive is going to be simply "slow". Have any data you want quickly on the SSD, and let the stuff that is coming over slowly and in bulk be on the HDD. A 7200rpm drive shouldn't matter that much for transferring specific files, but will always be 40% faster in finding the start of each file. In the end, I'd go with the cheaper HDD and if you want more speed then buy a bigger SSD (although with a 4:1 ratio of HDD:SDD, this shouldn't be needed).

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Amazon HDD really that bad? Newegg is bit expensive and had to pay extra shipping price...

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

No idea (and I've bought one I was pretty sure was already used). But I've never heard anything about them fixing their supplier problem.

Most of the problems seemed to center around Hitachi drives. But be careful about "fulfilled by Amazon" as who knows which bin that comes from. https://pcpartpicker.com/forums/topic/327924-used-drives-poping-up-from-amazon https://www.engadget.com/2018/05/31/fulfilled-by-amazon-counterfeit-fake/

There are also scare stories about packaging, but that might be just due to how many Amazon ships and the few failures will always slip through (and be the first to be complained about).

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

Are you keeping the PNY as your boot drive or would you like to change it to an NVME.

If you are using the HDD for games, a 7200RPM drive would have faster loading times:

https://pcpartpicker.com/product/xHzZxr/toshiba-internal-hard-drive-hdwe140xzsta

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

Yea. I would like to keep my 240 PNY as my boot and 1 TB SSD for games and microsoft office apps etc. and HDD for just storage.

  • 8 days ago
  • 1 point

The MX500 currently is the same price as the normally cheaper BX500, so I would recommend that one.

For the HDD, any will do. It depends on the spindle speed you want

  • 7 days ago
  • 1 point

Well getting a new SSD for your games sounds like a good idea. Sure NVMe is not mandatory as the real world speed difference between NVMe and SATA SSDs is minor for loading games and as far as moving large files to take advantage of NVMe you also need a source that can keep up with said NVMe or it becomes the bottleneck. Say my downloads folder is on my SSD and I transfer some video files I downloaded to one of my HDDs then it will not transfer faster than the HDD can write regardless of the speed of my NVMe SSD.

As for the argument of 5400rpm vs 7200rpm it depends on the use of the drive. If it is just for media (movies, music, pics, documents) then there is absolutely nothing wrong with 5400rpm. If you want to load games off the HDD that can't fit on the SSDs then I would recommend 7200rpm as it will be a bit faster than 5400rpm drives.

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Good point. Thank u

  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point
  • 6 days ago
  • 1 point

Benchmarks are an artificial test. Game loading times won't be night and day different. Say a game takes 30 seconds to load on a SATA SSD it may take 25 seconds to load on a NVMe SSD. According to those benchmarks it should load everything in 1/3rd of the time but realistically it won't.

There are workloads that can really take advantage of a NVMe such as using it as a scratch disk when dealing with raw 4k video footage while editing it. That is when you can notice a difference between them. Though not having to hook up cables to a NVMe stick like you do with a SATA SSD is also nice as far as ease of cable management too.

If you do want to get a NVMe drive then go for it. Luckily there isn't a huge cost difference from a budget NVMe compared to a SATA SSD but I would avoid any of the premium ones like the samsung NVMe SSDs.

  • 5 days ago
  • 1 point

Those benchmarks are a synthetic test only. While a good first comparision you can't expect to actually get those results in everyday use. While a NVMe drive can be 5x faster on benchmarks than a SATA SSD it won't be 5x faster boot time. You might save 1 second or so which is only ~10%. Certain tasks do take advantage of it, but for most regular users the only benefit would be large file transfers. But here it even depends on your source. Assuming you can download at infinite speeds you are still limited by that 1000mbps ethernet port, which is only 125MB/s and well under SATA SSD speeds. Userbenchmark also has data on usb drives and their fasted listed flash drive won't make use of NVMe when transfering either. So unless you use it as a scratch disk, home database server, or some other special use case, then you really need more than one to be able to transfer anything between them that will use the higher speed. Of course, if the price is equal or close, then grab one anyway maybe since you might get another a year later and then can transfer fast. Just don't be expecting the difference that you see on the benchmark comparison you linked in everyday use.

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