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Forum Topic "The best anti virus for a new gaming pc, that doesn't conflict with games, programs and updates"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 48 minutes ago

Windows Defender is fine. Sure, 3rd party solutions score a fraction of a percent better, but why subject yourself to the annoyances that come with the free and paid versions of AV if you don't need it? The free versions will pester you to pay for them, and the paid versions will pester you to pay for them again.

I never get spam email from windows defender, or popups, or ads, or anything. It updates itself automatically and operates in the background without interrupting my daily work or play.

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 1 hour ago

I never said the Ryzen was better than the i7, just that demanding resolutions like 4k or 1440p are going to be strongly limited by the GPU you have in there. If the CPU has to wait clock cycles for an interrupt, the GPU will be the limiting factor. It has always been this way.

This "always been this way" mentality requires assuming that games only have 1 visual quality setting, ultra.

Games have had vastly adjustable visual quality for 20 years+. Resolution is just 1 of many adjustments.

Might be to some but I suggest rather than invest in PC equipment they invest in a life.

Tell that to the person who just bought a 2080Ti.... ;)

It seems like you are an Intel fanboy.

Sitting in front of a 1700X machine at home and a 2600 at work.

I'm a fanboy of picking the right tool for the job, not trying to rationalize a way to an AMD solution for everyone, which so many people seem keen to do on here.

We're talking about a gaming rig with a 2080Ti and a 165hz display and we have people in this thread trying to rationalize why Ryzen CPU solutions make sense for this build, despite being at a significant performance deficit compared to Intel alternatives for the intended use. That's blatant fanboyism.

Forum Topic "Inexpensive Office Server"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 1 hour ago

Taking the rack-mount idea here and running towards a nice quality Supermicro case with hot-swap bays up front.


1U design:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium Gold G5400 3.7 GHz Dual-Core Processor $75.54 @ Amazon
Memory Kingston - 8 GB (1 x 8 GB) DDR4-2400 Memory $70.99 @ SuperBiiz
Storage HP - EX900 120 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $24.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.90 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.90 @ Amazon
Heatsink SUPERMICRO SNK-P0046P CPU Heatsink for Xeon Processor X3400 / L3400 $22.00 @ Monoprice
Case/PSU SUPERMICRO CSE-813MTQ-350CB Black 1U Rackmount Server Chassis $239.73 @ Newegg
Motherboard SUPERMICRO MBD-X11SCL-F-O Micro ATX Server Motherboard $218.52 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $761.57
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-21 17:43 EDT-0400

The 1U size more or less forces the use of a server style motherboard so the RAM points the right direction.


2U:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium Gold G5400 3.7 GHz Dual-Core Processor $75.54 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $85.99 @ Newegg
Memory Patriot - Viper Elite 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $77.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP - EX900 120 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $24.99 @ Newegg
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.90 @ Amazon
Storage Seagate - Constellation ES 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $54.90 @ Amazon
Case/PSU Supermicro SuperChassis 823TQ-653LPB $384.81 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $759.12
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-21 18:06 EDT-0400

No-Hot-Swap:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Pentium Gold G5400 3.7 GHz Dual-Core Processor $75.54 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - B365 Pro4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $85.99 @ Newegg
Memory Patriot - Viper Elite 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $77.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP - EX920 256 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $49.99 @ Amazon
Storage Western Digital - Red (Retail Kit) 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive $109.99 @ B&H
Storage Western Digital - Red (Retail Kit) 4 TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive $109.99 @ B&H
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Case NORCO RPC-430 Black 4U Rackmount Super Short Depth 15.25" Server Case $64.57 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $664.05
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-04-21 18:17 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 2 hours ago

The point I'm making here, is that you're trying to make this out like AMD owns the misinformation, like they are the origin of it.

The misinformation they attempted to take advantage of, has roots that go way back, long before they came along and attempted to breath more life into the lie.

I'm not saying AMD is innocent in this, on the contrary, I'm just setting the record straight here. AMD is not the "reason" this misinformation exists. Misguided gamers have been conceptualizing this incorrectly since forever. AMD just took advantage of this.

I'll just come out and say it: Stupid people are the reason this misinformation has held any traction. AMD is preying on the stupid by perpetuating it.

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 3 hours ago

With a 2080Ti, it would be a fair assumption that the builder will run this one on a 2K or 4K display.

It would be an equally fair assumption that the builder will run a 165-240hz display, and wants to maximize performance.

As it turns out, OP has selected a 165hz display.

Whatever advantage the i7 might have in low gaming loads will vanish/diminish at higher resolutions.

So you're saying that at higher resolution, less CPU power is required for a particular performance goal?

Or are you saying that with higher resolution, people automatically are assumed to have lower performance goals?

Either way, wrong. sorry.

the Ryzen 2700X is still a fine chip. He will not be missing out on a 9700K at all.

On a 165hz display, there's going to be a ~20% performance discrepancy between a 9700K and 2700X in a large number of games and conditions.

Huge innovations come with new chipsets, which is why I recommended AMD. Compatibility with older boards? Awesome.

This statement doesn't make any sense. If huge innovation comes with new chipsets, then why are you recommending the company that recycles the same chipset for many generations of CPU, only upgrading platform I/O and interfaces every 3-6 years?

Realistically speaking, CPU upgrade "path" is largely determined by what CPU is chosen at the outset of a build, not by whether the platform supports numerous generations of CPU's... Consider for a moment, someone who built around a B350 board and a Ryzen 3 1200, vs someone on the same board who installed a 1700X on day 1. The person who builds with the budget CPU, creates an upgrade path by cheaping out on the CPU. Nothing has happened that would give cause for anyone to upgrade a 1700X at this time, the margins for performance improvement are too small to bother. Even when Ryzen 3000 launches, it is looking very unlikely that there will be a compelling reason for the owner of the 1700X to want/need to upgrade within the useful life of this platform.

The important point here, is that upgrade paths come primarily from selecting lower end CPU's, not from selecting the "right" platform.

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 4 hours ago

The mythical conceptualizations of the relationship between CPU, GPU, performance, etc, have their origins predating the era of AMD's slump. AMD took a piece of misinformation that was already prevalent in the minds of gamers, and attempted to cash in on it by repeating it. AMD is not the "source" of these myths.

I would argue, that 2 decades of GPU reviews that use FPS as a yardstick to compare render throughput without appropriate disclosures and explanations, has set the stage for this misinformation to be believable.

There's also an innate desire among people in gaming, to buy into mythical premises if they are better than reality. Why else would they be gaming? Easy targets...

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 5 hours ago

Buying a 9700K now, would be less expensive than buying a 2700X and then a Ryzen 3000 upgrade for the build later this year or next year. The 9700K would also out-perform the 2700X in gaming, and likely perform as well or better than any 3000 upgrade anyway for gaming, making the 9700K more cost effective in terms of performance/$.

Assuming nobody would buy a 2700X now only to replace it in a few months, the 9700K would only costs about $100-200 more than a 2700X to implement, which is peanuts in a build with a 2080Ti. This will likely have less than a 10% impact on overall build cost, yet add 20-30% performance advantages in CPU bound conditions in gaming.

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 14 hours ago

In that title, yes. What about.... other games?

Forum Topic "AMD Gaming Build - $800 - $970"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 16 hours ago

Currently have a 490 in my old system.

490?

GTX 490?

That's an 8 year old GPU....

Do you mean RX 480?

Also curious, what CPU/Board/RAM do you have now?

Forum Topic "Best CPU to pair with a 2080 Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 16 hours ago

You should pick your CPU based on your performance goals, not based on your GPU selection.

Using a 60hz display? Any modern ~$150 CPU will work fine.

Using a 144hz+ display, you'll probably want Intel 6-8 cores, K model chips. 9700K is a great CPU for maximizing gaming performance.

Forum Topic "Upgrading CPU i5-9400F vs Ryzen 5 2600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 16 hours ago

Hi Exon,

If funds are tight, have you considered just upgrading the CPU on your existing computer? A 4790 or E3-1231 V3 or something along those lines would give you both more clock speed and hyper-threading, likely enough computing power to "tide" the build over a couple more years for a better upgrade later.

Forum Topic "Upgrading CPU i5-9400F vs Ryzen 5 2600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 16 hours ago

Overclock the 1700 (Comes with a better cooler anyway) and the 2600's advantage in less-threaded workloads largely dissolves into meaninglessness, while the 1700 has more on tap for streaming or other background tasks.

Forum Topic "I5-8400 vs AMD Ryzen 5 1600 vs AMD Ryzen 5 2600"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 1 day ago

Two full PCIe bandwidth M.2 something You don't get on AM4 other then high end boards and even then it disables large portions of the board.

If I understand correctly, the DMI 3.0 bridge from the PCH to the CPU on the 1151 platform is roughly similar in total bandwidth to a PCIE 4X, so while the new PCH's offer more connectivity, the actual I/O availability overall is technically lower than on the AM4 platform, which offers an additional 4X PCIE from the CPU for an M.2, as well as some USB 3.0 hosted directly from the CPU. While the AMD chipsets for the AM4 platform may offer less connectivity, there's overall more available bandwidth to/from the CPU and no chance of data bandwidth contention on the chipset to CPU bridge.

Anyway, that's just devils advocate having a word...

In practice, more connectivity is likely to be more useful than more I/O bandwidth for most users.

As the user of a B450M Pro4 at work, I can attest, the limited connectivity of this board sucks. Should have picked a board with 6X SATA at minimum for work.

Forum Topic "intel --> Ryzen"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 1 day ago

I don't understand side-grading from a poor-clocking 8700K to a 2700X that is guaranteed to run at even lower clocks anyway.

Even with no overclocking at all, the 8700K is a meaningfully superior gaming CPU than the 2700X.

Forum Topic "Why did Intel make the i9-9980XE?"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 3 days ago

I don't really understand why they made it at all. Anyone know?

Perhaps they were thinking it would be a good idea to sell fast 18 core CPU's to willing customers who need/want them?

Forum Topic "Photo Editing Build"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 7 days ago

Only if you want to make use of the new "enhanced detail" mode in lightroom, it's the only situation where a higher end GPU makes a meaningful difference in this application, otherwise 1660 is fine.

On a longer timeline, if Adobe begins taking advantage of the "RTX" special capabilities for a broader range of manipulations, then the advantage of the 2060 may become more pronounced over time. I wouldn't hold my breath, but who knows....

Forum Topic "which cpu should i buy?"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 8 days ago

Hi Vincent,

In looking at some of your other posts, it's apparent you're trying to piece together a computer for like $200-300.

Presumption here is that you also have to buy windows.... putting the total budget for the build at ~$300-400 with an operating system.


https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIAC0F7R83090&ignorebbr=1

CPU comparable in gaming to a 2400G (quad core, hyper threaded, haswell).

Comes with windows Pro, 16GB RAM, 500GB SSD.

GPU is a bit weak but still likely to be better than integrated graphics on a modern build. Can always be upgraded later. This is a much better start to a gaming rig than something you can build for the same price as you'll have enough CPU power and RAM to last a few years.

Forum Topic "which cpu should i buy?"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 9 days ago

Hi Vincent,

Barrel scraping on a new build is likely to be a waste of money.

A refurbished Dell Workstation class machine with a Sandy or newer i5 can be had for a few hundred bucks, throw a discrete GPU in there and you'll have a way better gaming rig than anything you can build for the same price.

Forum Topic "What to do with ECC DDR3??"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 11 days ago

If it's just ECC memory, NOT registered (buffered), then it will usually work in most DDR3 boards designed for unbuffered RAM regardless of whether the board/CPU supports ECC. On non-ECC supporting boards/CPU's the ECC function simply won't work.

If the memory is REGISTERED (buffered), then it can only be used with specific motherboards/CPU's that support registered memory.

Let us know whether the memory is registered or not and we can give some ideas about what to do with it.

Forum Topic "I5-9600k v i7-9700k"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 12 days ago

If you want to open up more options for streaming (higher quality, software encoding options), consider the 9700K or 9900K.

If you're just using a GPU's fixed function encoder for streaming, then the 9700K is probably a good bet.

Forum Topic "Triple monitor gaming build"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 13 days ago

I would buy DP to DVI cables, so that you don't have adapter dongles hanging from the back of the computer. It will be a lot cleaner this way and put less stress on the GPU outputs.

Forum Topic "6TB and 8 TB HDD WD Black vs Barracuda Pro or blue western"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 13 days ago

From what I have seen, SMR drives are either labeled "archive" drives, or this technology is snuck into specific models of consumer drives without obvious announcement, all the more reason to avoid consumer drives....

I'm advising enterprise drives like Seagate Exos X, WD Gold, HGST He, Toshiba MG07,

Forum Topic "6TB and 8 TB HDD WD Black vs Barracuda Pro or blue western"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 14 days ago

When I start contemplating drives in the 6TB or larger size, I start to ask my self if there's any reason to bother with a "consumer" class drive at all.

In this size class, enterprise class drives are where the focus is.

I'm looking at the 8TB baracuda pro for $274, thinking... Why not just spend another $40 and get a 10TB Helium Filled enterprise drive.

Forum Topic "Intel 660p worth it?"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 14 days ago

Since the price has dropped well below competing quality SATA models it's a great value. I wouldn't pay more for a 660P than I would for say, an MX500, but when it's priced way less, easy to rationalize.

Forum Topic "Little over $600 for a serious gaming PC"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 14 days ago

Windows license needed in build cost?

Forum Topic "Triple monitor gaming build"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 14 days ago

You're going to want your monitors connected to your GPU directly.

USB to "display" adapters, with the exception of those that tap into USB-C DP alternate mode, use a video compression mechanism to pass the video signal to a USB video playback device. This consumes CPU resources on your computer and introduces lag.

Connect your monitors directly to the GPU for best result. Since modern GPU's have a lot of displayports, you'll likely want to pick up some DP to DVI cables.

Forum Topic "Best CPU for a 2080Ti?"

Allan_M_Systems 8 points 14 days ago

I have been looking for new hardware for a while. I pre-ordered the 2080Ti, great GPU. Not great for the money, but even if it is just a 20% performance gain, its enough for me as I mainly want it for VR gaming and to play around with DXR.

GPU power will manifest as the ability to run higher visual quality settings. The GPU is not the source of performance.

When we benchmark gaming GPU's, we line them all up next to each-other running the same high visual quality settings and use FPS as the yardstick to compare render throughput. This is a reasonably valid test to compare GPU render throughput as long as the workload is consistently GPU bound across the entire range of products tested through the entire test. In practice many games used as "benchmarks" introduce problems for using this method of comparison (CPU/software/API bottlenecks that prevent the GPU power differences from emerging)... When all said and done, it's not a good idea to look at the results as having any relevance to the FPS you can expect in actual gaming, it's just a comparison of relative render throughput.

Performance originates with the CPU and is hard capped by the monitor refresh rate. The hard boundaries of performance are set by the CPU/Monitor. GPU bounded performance is inversely adjustable with visual quality.

But I keep being unsure how much to spend on the rest of the computer. Right now I have a 6700K, its about 3 years old now and I am pretty sure its quite the bottle neck for this monster GPU.

The 6700K has the same core architecture at around the same clock speeds as many current Intel CPU's. The only meaningful difference is that newer CPU's have added more cores. Whether or not you can actually make use of more cores depends on the specific game or application in question. For most games, there is very little difference in performance between a 6700K and 9900K.

It puts the 9900K at the top... the 9900K is the CPU I figured to be pretty perfect for my GPU.

You should pick your CPU based on the compute workload of your applications and gaming performance goals, not based on what GPU you have purchased. It doesn't matter if you're gaming with a GTX 1060 or RTX 2080Ti, if you want to game at high FPS in compute intensive games, you need a powerful CPU to do this either way.

First I was looking at the Threadripper CPUs, so... the 9900K is less pricey than that. I use my PC for much more than gaming though.............I play around with some hobby game development, general software development, web development, machine learning with TensorFlow, make videos of some games and game development tests and experiments and of course gaming which includes PC VR gaming and development. So I am not only looking for the gaming benefits. Which is why I also first considered the Threadripper series.

Z390 w/9900K is better suited to real-time workloads like gaming, editing, modeling, scrolling, resizing, preview rendering, and other "interactive" workflows.

X399 w/TR is better suited to compute intensive multi-threaded workloads like export rendering, multi-stream transcoding, simulation, batch exporting, compression, decompression, encryption, decryption.

But one of the main reasons I have not even considered AMD the last many years, is that Intel just seems way better when it comes to power efficiency. Looking at Threadripper, they seem very power hungry. I am not sure if having more cores means they will be better at scaling up and down in certain situations? Or does f.ex. the 250W of the 2990WX mean its constantly using way more power than a 95W 9900K?

Don't compare TDP ratings on modern CPU's. This is likely to cause a lot of confusion. Actual power draw of these platforms and CPU's varies dramatically depending on how they are configured. In many cases, the TDP rating dramatically under or overstates real world power dissipation.

So... it seems to come down to these choices: .......... 9900K, 2700X, 9700K, 2920X or 2950X.

2700X is 105W while the 9700K and 9900K both are at 95W.

When the 9900K is configured to actually honor its 95W TDP, it will only manage high clock speeds in lightly threaded workloads. Expect 2700X-like or lower clock speeds from this chip with TDP enforcement.

Most Z390 boards offer a way to adjust the long term TDP limit or completely turn it off, allowing the CPU to stretch its legs to the 150-200W territory required to run at high clocks under load.

The 2700X has 20MB cache while the Intel ones have 16MB. Also the AMD is 12nm while Intel is 14nm. But that does not seem to matter much, since the AMD one uses more power and has a lower clock-rate anyway?

These numbers are all academically interesting, but aren't useful for comparing these CPU's. AMD's core complex architecture actually requires more L3 cache to achieve the same performance results as a chip with a unified L3 cache. Nobody uses the same ruler to measure fabrication size either.

2920X is about 150 dollars more than the 9900K. It seems to have a lot of pros and cons... 12 cores, 24 threads and 3 levels of cache. One level having 32MB, another with 6MB and a third with... is it around 1MB or 1GB? Seems... unreal to have 1GB of cache? Also not sure what it means to have all these levels of cache? Does it help with the power consumption in any way?

Not sure where you're getting your numbers... Doesn't really matter. Ignore the cache sizes, they can't be compared directly the competition due to differences in architecture, latency, etc. Just pay attention to the performance differences.

Personally, I wouldn't bother with the X399 platform unless I were putting at minimum 16 cores in it and had a use for that many cores. There's a lot more costs involved with an X399 build than just a more expensive CPU. The motherboard is more, and in order to take advantage of all those cores in terms of workloads, you'll have to plan on probably twice as much RAM anyway.

So I am interested in these higher core count CPUs, but not if it means the whole PC will just generally throw power out the window even if I am just looking at Facebook or watching Youtube. I mean, I am mostly happy with even what my 6700K provides, but sometimes I do feel the rig wants to do more, but the CPU is being in the way. Now and then it also begins to cool at a much higher level than I experienced previously, which I am pretty sure is because the CPU is forced to run at full usage to keep up with the GPU... and probably still failing.

Enthusiast platform builds like the X399 will consume more power at idle than consumer platforms because they have a lot more I/O, more RAM channels, and often more widgets and accessories. If idle power dissipation is an important consideration, avoid enthusiast platform builds.

The 6700K is still a very competent CPU for many workloads. There are lots of possible reasons it could be feeling sluggish or running hot and loud that are unrelated to actually having a CPU performance problem. Dust in the computer is a common source of problems like this. Gunkware/Junkware/Adware/Spyware/Bloatware installed on a computer is a common source of performance problems.

Which also brings me to another topic. Water cooling? Is it noisy? I see many pages suggest regular fans if you do not plan to over-clock, and I generally do not over-clock. I also know that it varies a lot how much noise different fans can generate... but is water cooling generally more or less silent?

I recommend liquid cooling with heat-pipes. Heatpipes are a long term reliable way to cool using liquid that involves no moving parts to pump the liquid, no surface to surface seals that can fail/leak, no pump noise, no pump vibration. Liquid heatpipes come very close to the cooling performance of pumped liquid cooling.

Noctua and Thermalright make some nice heatpipe solutions.

Another factor to add to the list, is what you get with these CPUs, as it seems AMD and Intel CPUs might not provide the same features from their motherboards. AMD seems to have more... not sure if it is RAM or hard disk features. I saw some video from Linus Tech Tips about that.

Depends on what platforms you're comparing. Enthusiast platforms, like X299/X399, will certainly have more I/O than consumer platforms.

Consumer platform vs consumer platform, Intel's Z390 offers more I/O on paper than AMD's X470, however, actual implementation will vary from board to board. Comparing, for example, a $200 Taichi Z390 vs X470 board, the differences don't point to a clear leader in I/O.

Oh... and another thing to add. This CPU benchmark list:....https://www.cpubenchmark.net/high_end_cpus.html.....My current CPU is at 11109 points.......Compared to: 2950X at 25458 points 2920X at 21929 points 9900K at 20166 points 2700X at 17276 points 9700K at 17254 points

Check out the single threaded scores...

Prices.... So... looking at it only like this, it sure seems the 2700X is the best value for the money.

Depends on workload, depends on if the machine is being used for fun or for work.....

I would advise keeping your 6700K, cleaning up the system (both dust and junkware), and using it till the next major round of CPU offerings are available for consideration. See what Ryzen 3000 brings to the table.

Forum Topic "Triple monitor gaming build"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 14 days ago

The cost of a displayport to dvi cord is about the same as an adapter, may as well just have a nice clean corded connection without the weight of an adapter hanging off the GPU straining the connection and adding to the eyesore that the back of a computer already is.

Forum Topic "Triple monitor gaming build"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 14 days ago

USB to DVI won't work for this.

Forum Topic "Owned i7 6700 or a new 2600x"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 16 days ago

Can the motherboard/RAM from the pre-built carry over to the new build or is it a proprietary motherboard? (non-ATX standard power or mounting)

Forum Topic "AMD vs Intel Build"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 18 days ago

I want to game at 1440p with at least 60FPS with most AAA titles. I don't stream or multi-task.

Consider a Ryzen 5 2600X instead.

Better value for your intended use.

For just gaming, no streaming and heavy background tasks, the 2600X and 2700X perform basically the same.

Forum Topic "I7 2600 or 3770 - help me choose"

Allan_M_Systems 11 points 19 days ago

The "too hot" problem really only occurs with overclocking. For these locked chips on an H61 board, you have nothing to worry about. Any run-of-the-mill heatpipe cooler will work fine.

Since most H61 boards have garbage VRM's, you're better off with the 3770's better efficiency to reduce the current and heat on the motherboard.

Forum Topic "9700k + GTX 1070?"

Allan_M_Systems 4 points 19 days ago

I don't think there's such a thing as a "good AIO" so to my eye, brand doesn't matter. It's a product category to avoid if you value reliability.

Go to newegg and look at reviews for any AIO. 15-25% of respondents rate these things 1 egg. The 1 egg reviews are many and read like... "Leaked after 3 months." "Died after 6 months." "Pump squealing." "Louder than expected." "no better cooling than my $30 tower."......

If you want to complement your RAM with a reliable cooling option that still leverages liquid to move heat around, consider a "thin" liquid heatpipe tower like the Thermalright - TRUE Spirit 140 POWER, or Noctua - NH-U14S. Install a good quality PWM RGB fan on it.

Forum Topic "9700k + GTX 1070?"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 20 days ago

The 1070 will work fine.

The CPU/Monitor will be the hard limits on performance. GPU bound performance is inversely adjustable with visual quality, so you can no doubt hit your 144hz monitor refresh rate in most games with the 9700K, all you have to do is adjust the visual quality to allow the GPU to get there.

As far as AIO's are concerned, the X62 has a pretty hefty list of unhappy customers reporting back on newegg / amazon.

Honestly, none of the AIO's seem to make it unscathed through the end user review environment. The answer seems to be that some pumps are noisy and some units leak. A risk I would not take.

Forum Topic "9700k + GTX 1070?"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 20 days ago

Will the GPU bottleneck?

Hopefully, yes.

You have to bottleneck somewhere, either CPU, GPU, or monitor refresh rate. Of these options, monitor refresh and GPU bottlenecks are preferred.

RTX 2060 is probably the better buy at this point though, unless you're getting a 1070 for really cheap.


9700K has less thermal problem than 8700K as it has less thermal density and a better thermal path, but ultimately, the "killer" on these chips seems to be when people run them with the TDP limit completely removed. In that case, they maintain high clocks all the time at the expense of very high power dissipation which can be difficult to extract from such a small CPU.

I personally don't like AIOs, would suggest a nice big liquid heatpipe cooler instead. They are often very close in performance and have less things that can go wrong.

Forum Topic "Checking before I buy - can 1700x go 3.7 on a 212 Evo? Higher possible?"

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 20 days ago

My 1700X runs 3.825GHZ (set speed, which seems to result in an "actual" speed of almost exactly 3.8GHZ under load) on ~1.2V with a Thermaltake - Contac Silent 12. I've installed a better fan on the cooler than it came with but otherwise it's nothing special.

The reason I have the Contac 12, is that it was a "convenience/emergency" buy at microcenter when I picked up my CPU/MOBO after my old motherboard went belly up. This CPU cooler is likely worse than either the 212 EVO or any of the other better recommendations in this thread. Despite that, this overclock still works fine and temps are in check. Averaging ~70C during P95 torture testing with some iterations pushing 75C. In normal use it's never this hot.

All chips are different and your experience will surely vary. My advise is to see how far you can take the chip on 1.25V or less for starters, as there's often very little or nothing to be gained above this voltage threshold except huge increases in power dissipation/heat.


You're never going to get a 1700X to match 2700X performance. The 2700X's aggressive, optimistic turbo keeps it above 4GHZ in almost all workloads. You'd have to get the 1700X to like 4.4GHZ fixed to roughly compete.

Forum Topic "New pc that will be realavent for a few years but not super expensive"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 20 days ago

uh.... 2700X comes with the rgb variant of the wraith max, the wraith prism. Why not just buy the better binned CPU that comes with the better cooler and better clock speeds in the box for the same price?

Forum Topic "New pc that will be realavent for a few years but not super expensive"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 20 days ago

Here's a few ideas:


PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3 GHz 8-Core Processor $158.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - B450 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard $79.99 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $83.69 @ Amazon
Storage Intel - 660p Series 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $69.89 @ OutletPC
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $74.99 @ Amazon
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Fractal Design - Focus G (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $49.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 550 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $54.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $702.42
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 20:41 EDT-0400

Newegg has this CPU+MOBO in a combo with $50 off right now....

Double the RAM/SSD, nicer case/PSU. $200 well spent.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700 3.2 GHz 8-Core Processor $245.99 @ Newegg
Motherboard MSI - B450-A PRO ATX AM4 Motherboard $50.00
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $155.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $74.99 @ Amazon
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black/White) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $916.92
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 20:36 EDT-0400

A little more oomf on the CPU and a lot more on the GPU here... Includes Wifi/BT.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $289.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $109.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $155.98 @ Newegg
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg Business
Storage Seagate - Barracuda 3 TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive $74.99 @ Amazon
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Phanteks - Eclipse P350X (Black/White) ATX Mid Tower Case $69.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 550 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $79.99 @ SuperBiiz
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1239.91
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 20:28 EDT-0400

I feel like an Intel solution doesn't offer the same value for this price range for the intended use. Would be looking at 6C/6T and 6C/12T options, which are good CPU's, with better raw gaming performance, but less versatility for streaming/recording/editing.

Forum Topic "Friend needs a gaming pc under 450."

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 20 days ago

This basically makes the case for using a Dell Refurb....

Same price on the refurb buys twice the RAM, twice the SSD, and includes a windows 10 pro license.

Forum Topic "Friend needs a gaming pc under 450."

Allan_M_Systems 3 points 20 days ago

Get a refurbished Dell precision tower with a Sandy Bridge i5 or newer. Drop a GPU in it.

You're not going to build anything new for $450 that's worth bothering with. It'll be a waste of time and a disappointing outcome.

The presumption here is that you'll also need a windows license. This is where the refurbs win. Many come with Windows licensing.


https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIAC0F91T1768&ignorebbr=1

$310 for the computer.

Then just pick up an RX 570 for $130.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $129.99
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 20:05 EDT-0400

$440 total.

The i5-4570 is comparable in performance to a 2200G.

Comes with 16GB RAM and 512GB SSD.

Included PSU is ~350W and includes a 6-pin power connector for GPU's up to 150W.


Here's what it will cost to build something comparable from new parts:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 3 1200 3.1 GHz Quad-Core Processor $84.82 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte - GA-AB350M-DS3H Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard $69.95 @ Amazon
Memory Team - Vulcan 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-2666 Memory $80.98 @ Newegg
Storage Kingston - A400 480 GB 2.5" Solid State Drive $59.99 @ Amazon
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case Thermaltake - Versa H15 MicroATX Mid Tower Case $34.99 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - CX (2017) 450 W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply $46.99 @ Amazon
Operating System Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit $139.99 @ Other World Computing
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $647.70
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 20:15 EDT-0400

Not worth the effort. If you're going to build it, it would be a much better approach to spend more on better components that are worth putting the effort into.

Forum Topic "$1,500 Video Editing Build"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 21 days ago

The Intel 1151-2 w/Z390 might see a 10 core commet lake CPU later this year. Currently the platform supports 64GB RAM.

The AMD AM4 build might have an upgrade path to more cores, but nothing is confirmed yet. The hopeful theory is that we're going to see up to 16 cores on the consumer platform with AMD. This platform can be upgraded to 64GB RAM now.

The AMD TR4 has an upgrade path to 32 already available, and I expect we'll see a Rome based 32 or more core chip on this platform before it is retired, so there is some upgrade path there. Currently the platform supports up to 128GB RAM.

The Intel 2066 has an existing upgrade path to 18 cores and might see 20-24 cores before it is retired. Currently the platform supports 128GB RAM.


All of these platforms should theoretically be capable of supporting new higher density DDR4, doubling the RAM upgrade path. Whether AMD and Intel actually "unlock" support for this is unknown. Intel already has "unlocked" this support for their Xeon branded version of coffee lake, the E-2100 series CPU's / C26X chipsets. They may be inclined to keep the artificial limit in place on the consumer platform to keep the product differentiation in-tact.


In practice, CPU upgrade paths never really pan out like we envision. It's very rare you're going to find yourself looking at an upgrade option in one hand that looks far better than a platform update on the other. By the time a CPU upgrade is required for an existing platform, newer platforms will have made that path look far less useful.

Forum Topic "$1,500 Video Editing Build"

Allan_M_Systems 1 point 21 days ago

I often find myself cringing at an attempt to "drive" the direction of a build with a fixed budget.... Like... That tends to cause compromises where we don't want them and/or excesses where we don't need them because we're trying to hit a specific budget. I see this a lot on here....

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $524.90 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler Thermalright - Macho Rev.B 73.6 CFM CPU Cooler $49.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard Gigabyte - Z390 AORUS PRO WIFI ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $184.99 @ Amazon
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $155.98 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $154.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Zotac - GeForce RTX 2060 6 GB GAMING Video Card $348.99 @ SuperBiiz
Case Silverstone - Kublai ATX Mid Tower Case $101.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 850 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $119.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1718.71
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 16:33 EDT-0400

This is like... The right CPU, the right GPU, an OS/Application SSD, an editing SSD, nice quality board/case/psu to hold it all. The price doesn't line up with either of your numbers, but shoehorning this down to $1500 means giving up dedicated SSD editing space, or the 9900K, or RTX. Why compromise? On the other hand, spending another $300 to make this "use up" $2000 doesn't really help as it isn't enough "more" budget to comfortably plant this thing on an enthusiast platform with 12+ cores and 64GB RAM.


If I'm looking to save money on the build above with an AMD platform solution....

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 7 2700X 3.7 GHz 8-Core Processor $289.99 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - X470 Master SLI/AC ATX AM4 Motherboard $134.99 @ Newegg Business
Memory G.Skill - Aegis 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $155.98 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $154.99 @ Newegg
Video Card Zotac - GeForce GTX 1660 6 GB GAMING Video Card $219.99 @ Amazon
Case Silverstone - Kublai ATX Mid Tower Case $101.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 750 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $94.99 @ Newegg
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $1229.90
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 16:48 EDT-0400

I'm going to be inclined to press other areas of the build in the direction of value. Use the stock cooler, smaller PSU, cheaper motherboard, more value driven GPU selection. This way we're letting value as a premise drive the build, again, not a specific budget.


I wouldn't bother stepping up to an enthusiast platform unless you have $2500+ to throw at it:

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Threadripper 2950X 3.5 GHz 16-Core Processor $799.99 @ Newegg
CPU Cooler Noctua - NH-U14S TR4-SP3 82.52 CFM CPU Cooler $79.90 @ Amazon
Motherboard ASRock - X399 Taichi ATX TR4 Motherboard $304.98 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $367.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP - EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $154.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB XC BLACK EDITION GAMING Video Card $509.00 @ Amazon
Case Silverstone - Kublai ATX Mid Tower Case $101.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 1000 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $147.12 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $2542.94
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 16:56 EDT-0400

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9940X 3.3 GHz 14-Core Processor $1399.99 @ B&H
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Dark Rock Pro 4 50.5 CFM CPU Cooler $84.99 @ SuperBiiz
Motherboard ASRock - X299 Taichi XE ATX LGA2066 Motherboard $281.99 @ Amazon
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport AT 64 GB (4 x 16 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $367.99 @ Amazon
Storage HP - EX920 512 GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $76.99 @ Newegg
Storage HP - EX920 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $154.99 @ Newegg
Video Card EVGA - GeForce RTX 2070 8 GB XC BLACK EDITION GAMING Video Card $509.00 @ Amazon
Case Silverstone - Kublai ATX Mid Tower Case $101.98 @ Newegg
Power Supply SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 1000 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $147.12 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $3125.04
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-31 17:02 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on upgrading an i5-7600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 21 days ago

i7-7700K is expensive because by any reasonable measure it is still good.

It's being artificially inflated because it's the only upgrade path on older platforms.

Standing on their own, there's no reason for a used 7700K to sell for the price of a brand new i7-8700. Or for a new 7700K to sell for the price of an i7-8700K, yet here we are, and that's the reality.

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on upgrading an i5-7600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 21 days ago

The CPU I used was an i7-4790K, a very old dinosaur with very slow 1866MHz RAM. Your i5-7600 with DDR4 Ram should smoke it. Check your GPU.

The i7-4790K is actually better than the i5-7600, especially for conditions in some modern games that start to pin the i5's lack of parallelism.

Stutter is rarely caused by the GPU. Something else changed.

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on upgrading an i5-7600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 21 days ago

If you're interested in overclocking consider the Ryzen 7 1700. It's priced lower than the 2600X right now, offers really good value to someone who wants to tinker a bit with overclocking.

In practice, a stock clocked 2600X will out-perform an overclocked 1700 in most games, but the 1700 will have more headroom in terms of cores/threads to scale more work into as more work comes along, (streaming, more background tasks, newer games that use more, etc), so it's a reasonable compromise.

I think the problem I would have considering a 1700, is that even overclocked, it might be a bit of a downgrade compared to your current i5 in lightly threaded games, where the 2600X would be about on par in those.

Forum Topic "Looking for opinions on upgrading an i5-7600"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 22 days ago

I was just thinking... surely there must be 7700K's used for a decent price.....

Nope... $300 on ebay for used 7700K. Crazy.

Must be a lot of people in this predicament of being on a "quad-locked" platform, looking for the best path... Since the 7700K winds up "competing" with the cost of upgrading to a newer mobo to go better, it's holding a higher price point than it deserves in 2019.

My advise is to wait for Ryzen 3000. See what that offers. My concern with an upgrade to the 9400F or 2600X, is that this "upgrade" ONLY buys an improvement in parallelism, it doesn't have any meaningful impact on per-core performance compared to where you are now, so this winds up being a side-grade for many workloads. It would be nice to be able to aim for something that offers an upgrade in both areas. Ryzen 3000 may or may not offer this, but it's likely to have an impact on the price of competing Intel products. Also, by that time we are likely to see a more complete coffee lake refresh CPU lineup available. A 9700 (non-K) or something along those lines might be the right direction to consider here.

Forum Topic "$1,500 Video Editing Build"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 22 days ago

Unlimited budget: Intel has the best performance available when price is no object. i9-9980XE and other $1500+ i9's are consistently top tier performers for content creation.

Budget constrained: AMD usually offers better value for tighter budgets. The 8C/16T "threshold" seems to be a very important value target as performance scaling drops off rapidly below 8C/16T, and scales up above that more gradually and less consistently. If your budget pushes you below a 9900K on Intel, then AMD solutions will offer more value than competing Intel options.

As we start climbing up the price ladder, where we might be considering Intel 9900K/9820X and AMD 1950X/2920X/2950X, Things get a bit more muddled. The Intel options are better at their respective price points in less-threaded components of the workload like scrolling and preview rendering, while AMD options are better at bulk tasks like batch export rendering AND multi-tasking, - which is not well represented in benchmarks like those found at Puget.

Both work fine and will run Adobe applications without an issue.

At your budget I think it's going to depend on how much of your budget you want to commit to things like Storage/SSD's for project space. A 9900K can probably fit, but at the expense of drives and maybe some GPU grunt. A 2700X might afford a more well rounded build that winds up being more useful despite slightly lower CPU performance.

Forum Topic "First time building a budget PC for $700-$800.......HEEEELLLLLLLLPPPPPP PLS!!!!!!!"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 22 days ago

Hi Beastmode12,

Here's some ideas to help improve the value/performance of the build:


2600X comes with better heatsink and higher clocks out of the box - no need to performance tune. Very good gaming performance as-is. Motherboard includes Wifi. 1TB SSD. Better value GPU (8GB isn't helpful in this class of GPU, just get the 4GB). Nicer PSU (full modular, newer design, more efficiency, better build quality). Decent color scheme going on here for the white H500. (motherboard, RAM, GPU and PSU should all look pretty good in the H500 together).

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU AMD - Ryzen 5 2600X 3.6 GHz 6-Core Processor $184.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Gigabyte - B450 AORUS PRO WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX AM4 Motherboard $109.99 @ Amazon
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $83.69 @ Amazon
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $76.99 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $785.53
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-30 16:10 EDT-0400

Intel option with Coffee Lake 9400F offers slightly more gaming oomf than the 2600X for a few bucks more.

PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i5-9400F 2.9 GHz 6-Core Processor $159.89 @ OutletPC
CPU Cooler be quiet! - Pure Rock Slim 35.14 CFM CPU Cooler $29.88 @ OutletPC
Motherboard ASRock - Z390 Phantom Gaming SLI/ac ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $129.99 @ Newegg
Memory Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16 GB (2 x 8 GB) DDR4-3000 Memory $83.69 @ Amazon
Storage Intel - 660p Series 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $109.99 @ Newegg
Video Card ASRock - Radeon RX 570 4 GB Phantom Gaming D Video Card $129.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H500 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case $76.99 @ B&H
Power Supply Corsair - RMx (2018) 650 W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply $89.99 @ Amazon
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total $810.41
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-03-30 16:07 EDT-0400

Forum Topic "Where does the bottlenecking line draw for this CPU?"

Allan_M_Systems 5 points 22 days ago

CPU bottlenecking occurs based on game selection, game conditions, various game settings, and performance goals and/or monitor refresh rates.

The CPU bottleneck "threshold" has nothing to do with your GPU selection. The 2200G will have the exact same performance limitation whether driving an RX 560 or VEGA 64.

Higher powered GPU's will allow you do run higher visual quality settings, and will raise the GPU bottleneck threshold for a given visual quality setting. This is a totally separate bottleneck that is dependent on conditions and settings.


Pick your CPU based on your performance goals in the games you want to play, period.

Pick your GPU based on your visual quality goals at those performance goals in the games you want to play, period.

Performance goal is largely driven by monitor refresh rate.

Visual quality goal is largely driven by monitor resolution.

Do not pick a CPU/GPU combination based on a mythical idea about how their relationship works. Under no circumstances will these components ever be more than the sum of parts. In fact, you can count on the CPU, GPU, or monitor refresh always being a bottleneck, so performance is always dictated by the weakest link and that is a moving target depending on many variables.


2200G works great for 60hz performance goals in most games.

If you have a 144hz monitor you want to take advantage of, you'll probably want to consider a better CPU.

Forum Topic "hi ! I have a doubt"

Allan_M_Systems 2 points 22 days ago

8700K has board options that support thunderbolt cards. For some low latency music production environments, thunderbolt connected audio interfaces are preferable.

The 8700K is also a better CPU for low latency audio production, especially when overclocked.

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